This is the joint website of  Women Against Rape and Black Women's Rape Action Project. Both organisations are based on self-help and provide support, legal information and advocacy. We campaign for justice and protection for all women and girls, including asylum seekers, who have suffered sexual, domestic and/or racist violence.

WAR was founded in 1976. It has won changes in the law, such as making rape in marriage a crime, set legal precedents and achieved compensation for many women. BWRAP was founded in 1991. It focuses on getting justice for women of colour, bringing out the particular discrimination they face. It has prevented the deportation of many rape survivors. Both organisations are multiracial.

 

 

 

Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority

Letter to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority protesting discrimination on the basis of a woman's "character and conduct"

Dear Peter Spurgeon,

We are writing to complain about discrimination by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority against rape survivors. Paragraph 13 allows CICA Members wide discretionary power to reduce or refuse compensation on the basis of an applicant’s character or conduct. This power is being abused to discriminate against some victims.

In particular, we refer you to the CICA’s recent treatment of Ms S (your ref. x/97/206610-REV1) who, while working as a prostitute in September 1996, was raped, beaten and robbed. Her assailant was prosecuted and sentenced to five, three and three years in prison to run concurrently. Ms S applied for compensation as is her statutory right.

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Woman wins appeal against compensation cut made because she had been drinking

Rape victim's victory ends blame shame

by LOUISE NOUSRATPOUR, Morning Star, 12 August 2008

RAPE victim campaigners demanded changes in the law on Tuesday to stop "old and sexist prejudices" getting in the way of justice after a woman won an appeal against a compensation cut made because she had been drinking.

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) admitted on Tuesday that, in the past year, around 14 women had been told that they would receive lower levels of compensation due to alcohol consumption.

But one unnamed woman, who believes that she was raped four years ago after having her drink spiked, successfully overturned a decision by the CICA to cut her compensation because she had been drinking "excessively."

She said that being told that the already meagre standard award of £11,000 would be reduced by 25 per cent "felt like a slap in the face."

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