This is the joint website of  Women Against Rape and Black Women's Rape Action Project. Both organisations are based on self-help and provide support, legal information and advocacy. We campaign for justice and protection for all women and girls, including asylum seekers, who have suffered sexual, domestic and/or racist violence.

WAR was founded in 1976. It has won changes in the law, such as making rape in marriage a crime, set legal precedents and achieved compensation for many women. BWRAP was founded in 1991. It focuses on getting justice for women of colour, bringing out the particular discrimination they face. It has prevented the deportation of many rape survivors. Both organisations are multiracial.

 

 

 

Black Women's Rape Action Project

Founded in 1991, we are one of the few Black women's organisations specialising in offering counselling, support and advice to Black women and other women of colour, immigrant and refugee women, who have suffered rape, sexual assault or other violence

BWRAP joins SlutWalk

Event

Start and End Dates

We invite you to join London SlutWalk with us, this Saturday 11 June. In stark contrast to the way events are often structured, the London organisers approached our group seeking the active involvement of women of colour. We will be marching and speaking at the rally.

SlutWalks have taken place in a number of countries, and more are proposed including in India. Yet some Black feminists have condemned them as irrelevant to women of colour, and dismissed the organisers as ‘white middle-class women’. We reject this view.

SlutWalk is a much needed occasion to break down divisions and strengthen everyone’s right to protection and justice, no matter who we are, where we were raped or who raped us.

We want to make visible the 70% of women from Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America and elsewhere who are seeking asylum in the UK after suffering rape and other torture.

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Slutwalk

Event

Start and End Dates

d_reasonably_small.jpgWAR will be taking part in the Slutwalk on Saturday in Trafalgar Square, London, and speaking at the rally.

In January, police officer Michael Sanguinetti told students at a Toronto Law School that "women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimised." Thousands of women protested in the first Slutwalk in Toronto. Their manifesto said: "We are tired of being oppressed by slut-shaming; of being judged by our sexuality and feeling unsafe as a result. Being in charge of our sexual lives should not mean that we are opening ourselves to an expectation of violence, regardless if we participate in sex for pleasure or work. No one should equate enjoying sex with attracting sexual assault."

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Mothers win right to family life in the UK

Success story

Mothers win right to family life in the UK

Two mothers, both of whom have lived in the UK for over 10 years and whose children were born here, have resisted efforts to return them to Jamaica and have now won the right to stay in the UK under Article 8 of the Human Rights Act (Article 8, the right to respect for private and family life.)  One woman took part in the 40 day hunger strike at Yarl’s Wood Removal Centre to bring attention to the injustice of her case.

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Neisha Hemmings, speaking at the House of Commons, 14 January, 2010

Resource

transcripts.jpgI was in Yarl’s Wood for five months and came out in December 2009. I seek asylum from Jamaica cause I am a lesbian, and in my tribunal case, my partner came and she gave evidence and everything. I’ve given all my letters of support, all my evidence, and in my determination I was told that they didn’t believe that I was a lesbian, but the judge believed my partner (laughter). I have been refused. In the determination, they refused me ‘cause, what happens is that when the judge decided my first case – every other judge is going on that same decision.

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Can You Hear us? Michelle, 14 January 2010

Resource

image045.pngI’ve lived in the UK for almost nine years now.  I’ve got my indefinite to remain in this country.  I was sentenced to two years in prison for shop lifting which I did because I had to support my children and also because my husband is very abusive to me.  I have two children that were born in this country, one of which is six years, however I was still served with a deportation order while I was in prison.  And I was detained for eight and a half months in Yarl’s Wood.   My children were put with a family friend and were being supervised by social services.

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We are here because . . .

Resource

We are here because . . .

. . .  is an inspiring and moving collection of online video and other testimonies, filmed, recorded, edited and produced by Black/women of colour, who are service users and volunteers with Black Women’s Rape Action Project. The testimonies are the product of an invaluable process whereby women from different backgrounds worked together, developed technical skills, and learnt from each other.

The majority are members of the All African Women’s Group a self-help group of women asylum seekers.  Most are mothers, some have been in detention, many have been separated from their children.  All give deeply compelling and often painful accounts of what they have been, and still go through, to get protection and rebuild their lives.

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